SIMMONS: Basketball the furthest thing from Raptors’ mind after Blake shooting

Elwanda Tulloch

Article content continued “It’s just starting to feel like everything we’re doing is just going through the motions and nothing’s really changing,” Raptors guard VanVleet said. “And here we are again with another unfortunate incident.” VanVleet has lived this life. When he was five, he lost his father, whom he […]

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“It’s just starting to feel like everything we’re doing is just going through the motions and nothing’s really changing,” Raptors guard VanVleet said. “And here we are again with another unfortunate incident.”

VanVleet has lived this life. When he was five, he lost his father, whom he barely knew, shot in a drug deal. On Sunday, he was in his hotel room on what should have been Kobe Bryant’s birthday, and was reading the online post by Vanessa Bryant and thinking and crying, they lost their dad: “I lost my dad.”

And then came the online video we’ve all seen by now. The shooting of Blake in the back that apparently paralyzed him in Wisconsin.

“You can’t make sense of it,” VanVleet said. “You can’t.”

There is a game to play Thursday night when the Raptors and Celtics meet and, under closer to regular circumstances, this would be all we would be talking about right now.

The basketball may still be great. These teams are that good. The series is important. But VanVleet can’t wrap his head around that right now.

This was Tuesday for him. He’ll be ready, he says, because that’s what he does, but not ready to talk much about basketball heading into Game 1.

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“I’m tired of sitting up here and talking about Black Lives Matter and trying to affect change,” said Powell, who grew up in South East San Diego. It wasn’t Compton. But it was close.

“If I took a gun and killed somebody, we’re going to jail, we’re not going back home and continue on with our daily lives while they investigate what’s going on.”

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