USA Badminton introduce schools and coaching programmes

Elwanda Tulloch

USA Badminton (USAB) has implemented the Badminton World Federation (BWF) schools and coach certification programmes.

Entitled “Shuttle Time”, the schools programme offers teachers access to free resources, training and equipment, which supports the teaching of safe and inclusive badminton activities to children aged five to 15 years old.

The programme is now being implemented in 138 countries. 

Resources are now also available for coaches, with the online component of the BWF level one coach certification programme free of charge and open to all members of USAB.

After successful completion of the online component, an in-person assessment will be conducted by a BWF certified instructor for certification as a level one coach. 

The Shuttle Time programme teaches badminton to children ©BWF
The Shuttle Time programme teaches badminton to children ©BWF

“Fortunately, the first part of the BWF course can be taken online, and we intend to introduce the required in-person seminars throughout the United States as soon as possible,” said

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